First time Breeding Pigeons

Kai: Almost a year ago I acquired 4 homing pigeons from a man at the keepers of the old ways expo in Blountstown Florida. When we got them home, I found that it had been a stressful move for the younger bird, and I had to nurse him back to health because he’d lost a lot of weight. The 4 birds had to gain back their muscles after being in quarantine, and once they were finally released into the coop, I found their behavior hard to follow…for months and months, all they did was fight and claim perches.

I determined that all 4 of them were males.
I spent many months after looking for someone who had females available, and one day I finally found that guy. I asked for 3 female birds, and he said he’d be glad to supply them – however I did not expect what exactly it was that I was about to receive.

The ladies ended up being pedigree Belgian racing pigeons! Definitely not what I was expecting, but a very cool surprise!
We have had the girls for roughly 3 months now, and 2 have paired with my white rollers.

As of now, there is a baby in one nest, and eggs in the other.
It is very exciting and I am particularly thrilled with the pigeons as they are a bird I’ve wanted to work with for a very long time. I love their endearing behaviors and fascinating history, both as birds, and with mankind.

Although “common” and sometimes referred to as pests, pigeons are one of my favorite birds for many reasons. I hope to share those reasons as I progress in my experience with them, but for now, I shall enjoy the first step of this journey…

The baby in the picture is under a week old. Homing pigeons are extremely caring to their young, so unlike coturnix quail, and many breeds of chickens, you do not have to artificially incubate their eggs. Both parents will incubate, feed, and protect the nest.

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